How the “House of Cards” Title Sequence Was Filmed

How the “House of Cards” Title Sequence Was Filmed

David Fincher always makes an effort to include creative title sequences in his projects. For “House of Cards” the director picked Andrew Geraci, owner of District 7 Media, to shoot a complex time-lapse sequence of Washington DC. In a recent interview, Geraci talked about working with Fincher:

6 Filmmaking Techniques that Audiences Hate

No filmmaker sets out to make a bad movie. When a movie is bad, then, it is usually not from a lack of trying. Instead, it is more the product of a disconnect between how a filmmaker thinks an audience will respond and what actually works. Below is a list of some common filmmaking techniques that are surefire ways to lose audience interest.

Danny Boyle talks “Trance” (and the Olympics)

Danny Boyle talks “Trance” (and the Olympics)

I always look forward to Boyle’s movies. His choices concerning subject, music and style are exciting and unique. Also, the man knows how to construct a story: he spent years honing his craft in T.V. (“Inspector Morse”) before he was given the chance to direct a movie. Below is a nice interview with Boyle, courtesy of the DP/30 team. I found the description of his process interesting, especially how he caps his budgets at around $20 million.

Considerations on “the Killing of Innocents” as a Documentary Subject

Considerations on “the Killing of Innocents” as a Documentary Subject

Films with a legitimate claim to the title “documentary” should have a sense of objectivity and be rooted in actual events. The word documentary, after all, refers to evidence observable outside anyone’s creative process. With any documentary, part of the creator’s contract with the audience is clear before even the audience takes its seat: in what they are about to see, viewers can expect information to have been given a higher value than entertainment or motivation. It does not follow from this that documentaries will be inherently boring.

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